Oregon Department of Transportation: 2006 Transportation Plan Survey

Abstract:

A statewide telephone survey was conducted between January 20-30, 2006 as part of the review of the Oregon Transportation Plan. The purpose of this research was to gauge Oregonians’ attitudes and opinions about transportation improvement needs around the state, priorities for developing a transportation system, willingness to pay for additional improvements, and specific transportation related issues including public transit, traffic congestion, and the impact of transportation on the economy and air pollution. We interviewed 1,511 Oregonians age 18 and older (general population) using random digit dialing – 300 each from Metro, Northwest, Southwest, Central, and Eastern regions of the state. The survey averaged 15 minutes, and the overall margin of error for this study is +/-2.52%, at the 95% confidence level. Statewide results are reported based on data that is weighted to reflect the population distribution of the state. Any reports on regional differences reflect unweighted results. In general, residents of the state agree on approaches for improving traffic congestion, express a need for public transit service in their area, and believe transportation problems in the state will get worse over the next five years.The full written report, following the executive summary, elaborates on other subgroup findings (including gender, age, income, education, etc.).

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Northwest Health Foundation: 2006 Survey

Abstract:

A statewide survey research conducted in November, 2006 to provide a baseline about values, beliefs, and priorities of Oregonians about the health of the public. Along with other research and public involvement efforts, this information will be used by the Northwest Health Foundation and its partners to develop and promote specific initiatives to improve the public’s health. The primary survey was conducted online, with respondents drawn randomly from an established panel1 of Oregonians (n=1,355). A smaller telephone survey was conducted (n=417) to validate and supplement the online survey research findings. Respondents were age 18 and over. The primary survey was conducted online, with respondents drawn randomly from an established panel1 of Oregonians (n=1,355). A smaller telephone survey was conducted (n=417) to validate and supplement the online survey research findings. Respondents were age 18 and over. Respondents emphasized the importance of affordable and accessible health care for all, as well as the overall health and well-being of people in their communities.

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COLT Communications and Engagement: 2019 Survey

Abstract:

A survey conducted via online panels, telephone, and mail during November and December of 2018 of 2,528 Oregon residents and 207 southern Washington residents to determine what residents of Oregon and southern Washington value about living in their communities, what features and issues are most important to them, their attitudes and behavior related to land conservation, and the most effective messaging for different population subgroups. Quotas and statistical weighting were used to ensure a representative sample. Oregon reporting was based on a representative sample of 403 Oregon residents and has a margin of error of +/-2.9% to +/-4.9%. Messaging findings for subgroups are based on all completed Oregon surveys (n=2,582) and have a margin of error of +/-1.2% to +/-1.9%. Findings show a shared value of nature and the outdoors, with an emphasis on the importance of accessibility, as well as a growing interest in nature among Oregonians.

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PolicyInteractive: Finding Common Ground in a Divided Political Culture 2017-2018

Abstract:

In December of 2017, PolicyInteractive surveyed 1200 registered voters from four states, which was reduced to a sample size of 1103 after we removed invalided surveys. Of the 1103 respondents, 518 are registered to vote in Oregon. The four states, Oregon, Washington, California and Colorado, were mainly chosen to increase respondent numbers as well as to examine how Oregon might share political values with specific western states for collaborative purposes. Through this project, we made the discovery that Oregon is not as polarized as the November 2016 election results would suggest. Despite the stark red-and-blue divisions exposed by many of the choices on the ballot, most Oregonians share common ground on important issues — notably climate change and health care. Building on surveys conducted on a national scale by the Pew Research Group, this project involved sorting Oregonians into eight political archetypes or typologies, ranging from “Solid Liberals” on the far left to “Core Conservatives” on the far right. We found that in Oregon, only 30 percent hold opinions that place them in those solid blue liberal or bright red conservative outer bands of the political spectrum. The remaining 70 percent comprise six other voter archetypes in which liberal and conservative ideas are mixed in surprising ways. Of 25 defining topics often parlayed as divisive, only five can be observed as truly contested. The larger picture displays opportunities for cooperation and progress on challenging topics most Oregonians want solutions on.

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Big Look Survey on Land Use, Oregon 2008

Abstract:

Davis, Hibbitts & Midghall, Inc. (DHM) conducted the online survey from September 17 to 23, 2008, among 842 residents in the state of Oregon that lasted an average of 10 minutes. This research was conducted to assess public attitudes towards land use issues in the state in order to guide the Big Look Task Force in their comprehensive review of the state’s land use system. A stratified (rather than proportional) sample was used to better understand attitudes in the different areas of the state—Tri-County, Willamette Valley, and the Rest of State, with approximately 300 interviews completed in each of the three areas of the state. The effects of land use policies vary from urban to rural areas, while at the same time, Oregonians are ideologically divided across geographic regions resulting in consistent differences in how urban and rural residents view land use regulations and their visions for policy reform. Broadly speaking, urban residents are more comfortable with government regulation and higher taxes to protect and preserve natural spaces and farm land than their rural counterparts. Rural residents tend to be more suspect of government and favor less regulation and taxes.

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The Chalkboard Project: Public Attitudes Toward K-12 Education in Oregon, 2004

Abstract:

Davis, Hibbitts and Midghall, Inc. (DHM) is pleased to present the following description of the opinion research methodology used for the Chalkboard Project (Chalkboard). The research was conducted to assist with development of an overall strategy for addressing public education quality, accountability, and financing in Oregon.

The research had two components:

· Quantitative Research: Statewide telephone and online survey research to quantify Oregonians’ opinions about K-12 public education, including their feelings about proposals to address problems related to education quality, accountability, and finance. Statewide Telephone Baseline Survey: This quantitative research involved a statewide telephone survey of Oregon’s general population age 18+ conducted between April 17 -25, 2004. The sample size was 1800. A stratified (rather than proportional) sample was used for the survey to better understand attitudes in different areas of the state. Three hundred respondents were selected from each of six regions of the state: Portland Metro, Coastal, Willamette Valley, Southern, Central, and Eastern. Statewide Online Initiative Testing: An online survey was completed by 800 Oregonians to learn how they felt about Chalkboard’s initiatives. Final results for the online survey were statistically weighted to account for any variations and to assure a valid sample. Statewide Online Parent Survey: Three surveys were developed to learn how parents felt about the issue of parental involvement. Versions of the questionnaires were developed for households with children age 5-10, 11-14, and 15-18. Respondents came from the panel referred to above and 200 households with a child in the appropriate age range completed each survey.

Qualitative Research: Focus group discussions and one-on-one interviews to learn more about the attitudes of Oregonians and representatives of stakeholder groups (e.g, teachers, principals, and parents) toward public education and a significant statewide civic engagement process, which reached out and heard from Oregonians in all 36 counties. We used different types of data collection exercises in the focus groups. Examples include role playing, free associations, linear mapping, guided fantasy, and sentence completion. Each of these proved valuable in bringing out different ideas, elaborating on expressed attitudes and reported behavior, and probing for underlying motivations. In addition, in most of the group discussions, participants completed at least one written questionnaire to help identify quantitative boundaries and changes in opinion during the course of the group meeting. Various focus groups were composed of school board members, students, teachers, parents, principals, statewide focus groups, as well as two groups composed of special needs students and their parents.

The research provided valuable insight into student achievement assessments, general problems with the K-12 education system, best practices, and roles for Chalkboard, Teachers, Principals, and Parents.

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Oregon Values & Beliefs Study – 2002

Abstract:

The continuation of the 1992 Oregon Values and Beliefs Survey, the 2002 Oregon Values and Beliefs study included more than 2,600 Oregonians from across the state. A statewide telephone survey was conducted in November of 2002 of 1200 randomly selected respondents, with 300 interviews each from the Portland Metro Area, Southern Oregon, Eastern Oregon, and Western Oregon. Regional large group discussions were also conduced in Medford, Klamath Falls, Salem, Eugene, Roseburg, Bend, Pendleton, Beaverton, and Clackamas. It provides valid and statistically reliable information at the regional level and by age, gender, income and education. In addition to conventional opinion surveys, the study also used large group discussions and scaled comparisons as a means of ranking abstract qualities such as personal values, personal activities, and attitudes about government services. Respondents were asked about their communities, the economy, education, government services, as well as funding public services. Trends emerged revealing a set of “Core Values” that Oregonians share, some of which endure from the 1992 Oregon Values and Beliefs Survey, some of which have changed, and some of which are just beginning to emerge.

 

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